Category: Raffles Reviews

Food Reviews: Chill@RI

By Asfar Alim (18S03J), Angus Yip (18A01A), Adri Faris (18A13A), Zhu Xiuhua (18S06A), Elizabeth Leong (18S06G), Soh Ying Qi (18A01C) and Jeslyn Tan (18S06R)

With the introduction of the Healthy Meals in Schools Programme (HMSP) in 2017, many students lamented the disappearance of their favourite snack foods from the shelves of Chill@RI, as new and often lesser-known (and ostensibly healthier) alternatives began to replace them. For those who have yet to give these new brands a shot, Raffles Press presents our latest round of food reviews: snacks from Chill@RI.

Continue reading “Food Reviews: Chill@RI”

“The Post” Review: Papers and Politics in a Post-Truth World

By Soh Ying Qi (18A01C)

Spoiler alert: you already know what happens in this film.

Not because it looks like standard Hollywood period-drama fare, comprising an ensemble cast led by established stars, a screenplay peppered with references to “the First Amendment right to free speech” and “Based on a true story” tacked onto the end of its trailer. But if I told you that in 1971 The New York Times and The Washington Post were sued in the Supreme Court of the United States for publishing a set of politically sensitive documents, you’d know the outcome of the trial before ever picking up a single history book.

Continue reading ““The Post” Review: Papers and Politics in a Post-Truth World”

Thor: Ragnarok – Adapting Ancient Mythology in the 21st Century

By Choi Hoe Chang (18S07A)

There is no doubt that Thor: Ragnarok is a ton of fun.

Director Taika Waititi married his eccentric energy with Marvel’s house style, enabling the “Marvel Formula” – filmmaking and storytelling style that puts emphasis on lightheartedness and spectacle –  to still stand despite the fact that this movie is the 17th installation in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Continue reading “Thor: Ragnarok – Adapting Ancient Mythology in the 21st Century”

Thoughts on Jeremy Tiang’s “State of Emergency”

By Abigail Ang (18S06B)

When can history be truly left in the past? For some, never.

State of Emergency explores the effects of the leftists movements and government detentions in Malaya on the lives of various characters from the 1950s to the present day, who are often forced to reckon with difficult choices and moral dilemmas.

Continue reading “Thoughts on Jeremy Tiang’s “State of Emergency””